Like A Thief
IN The Night

Anna; XVIII, ENFP

"And we swagger because we do not know how to part with our rage, which we cherish and press cutting close, but we learn to swagger — or rather, we’re swaggered, briefly, while the wind blows and things burn and our hands are full — because we know it darkly all the same."

antiquatedremains:

Heir to the Throne of Ghosts - © S.Wilson - 2014

antiquatedremains:

Heir to the Throne of Ghosts - © S.Wilson - 2014

An incredible engraved Colt Single Action Army

georginakincaid:

The word sword comes from the Old English sweord, cognate to swert"to wound, to cut"

The sword is symbolic of liberty and strength. In the Middle Ages, the sword was often used as a symbol of the word of God. The names given to many swords in mythologyliterature, and history reflect the high prestige of the weapon and the wealth of the owner.

malformalady:

Vietnam soldier’s hidden cross folding knife pendant combination

malformalady:

Vietnam soldier’s hidden cross folding knife pendant combination

art-of-swords:

Japanese Shibayama Ivory & Silver-Mounted Dagger

  • Measurements: 20.5cm; 8in blade

Also called “Aikuchi-Tanto”, this curved single-edged blade dagger is incised with a dragon on each side. It has a silver-mounted hilt finely engraved and enriched with soft metal birds and scrolls.

The ivory grip is encrusted with coloured shells, coral and malachite including an elaborate bouquet on one side and with a bouquet in a basket suspended from a tree on the other.

It has a silver-mounted ivory “saya” decorated en suite with the hilt, including differing blossoming trees on the respective faces inhabited by exotic birds and completed with its “kozuka” decorated, again, en suite.

Source: Copyright 2013 © Thomas del Mar


Swept Hilt Rapier, English, ca. 1600. (x)

Swept Hilt Rapier, English, ca. 1600. (x)

art-of-swords:

Mughal Dagger

  • Dated: 17th century - 18th century
  • Culture: North India
  • Medium: Jade, steel, gold and cabachon rubies and emeralds
  • Measuremenrs: Length: 24.1 cm, blade
  • Unknown Artist / Maker

Source & Copyright: The Wallace Collection

art-of-swords:

The Swept-Hilt Rapier
The name of the rapiers refers only to the sword’s guard, handle, and pommel. For example, types of Renaissance sword hilts include: swept-hilt, shell, half-hilt, cup-hilt, dish-hilt, dueling-hilt, cavalier-hilt, Pappenheimer, mortuary-hilt, basket-hilt, etc.
Swept-hilt is an early Renaissance hilt form designed originally to protect the unarmored hand from cuts more than thrusts, they are made up of finger-rings, side-rings, knuckle-guard, and often a variety other protective bars (back-guards and counter-guards, etc), they are found on many cut & thrust swords and early rapiers The name is actually a Victorian era term and not a istorical one.
The rapier was the first civilian weapon, developing as the use of armor declined. A thrust and cut weapon, the rapier first appeared in the late 1400’s and had its heyday up to the 1600’s. The 1600’s saw the start of the transitional rapier as hilts became smaller and blades were designed more for thrusting and less for cutting.
The cup hilt rapier and Swept Hilt Rapier made their appearances in the early 1650’s in Spain, and enjoyed popularity in Spain and Southern Italy until the early 1700’s. The rapier was often used with a second defensive weapon; daggers, bucklers, and cloaks were the most popular.
While daggers were often decorated “en suite” with their companion rapier, it was by no means unusual to have a “mismatched” set of rapier and dagger. Much lighter than the broadsword of medieval times, the rapier brought about a whole new style of swordplay and a proliferation of fencing schools.

Info source: The ARMA | Swept Hilt Rapier 

art-of-swords:

The Swept-Hilt Rapier

The name of the rapiers refers only to the sword’s guard, handle, and pommel. For example, types of Renaissance sword hilts include: swept-hilt, shell, half-hilt, cup-hilt, dish-hilt, dueling-hilt, cavalier-hilt, Pappenheimer, mortuary-hilt, basket-hilt, etc.

Swept-hilt is an early Renaissance hilt form designed originally to protect the unarmored hand from cuts more than thrusts, they are made up of finger-rings, side-rings, knuckle-guard, and often a variety other protective bars (back-guards and counter-guards, etc), they are found on many cut & thrust swords and early rapiers The name is actually a Victorian era term and not a istorical one.

The rapier was the first civilian weapon, developing as the use of armor declined. A thrust and cut weapon, the rapier first appeared in the late 1400’s and had its heyday up to the 1600’s. The 1600’s saw the start of the transitional rapier as hilts became smaller and blades were designed more for thrusting and less for cutting.

The cup hilt rapier and Swept Hilt Rapier made their appearances in the early 1650’s in Spain, and enjoyed popularity in Spain and Southern Italy until the early 1700’s. The rapier was often used with a second defensive weapon; daggers, bucklers, and cloaks were the most popular.

While daggers were often decorated “en suite” with their companion rapier, it was by no means unusual to have a “mismatched” set of rapier and dagger. Much lighter than the broadsword of medieval times, the rapier brought about a whole new style of swordplay and a proliferation of fencing schools.

Info source: The ARMA | Swept Hilt Rapier 


Dagger and sheath, Dagestani, 1861. (x)

Dagger and sheath, Dagestani, 1861. (x)


Swept Hilt Rapier, English, ca. 1600. (x)

Swept Hilt Rapier, English, ca. 1600. (x)


Sword, 1798-1799

Sword, 1798-1799



Dagger owned by Princess Adile Sultana (1825-1898)

Dagger owned by Princess Adile Sultana (1825-1898)



Dagger and sheath, Dagestani, 1861. (x)

Dagger and sheath, Dagestani, 1861. (x)

art-of-swords:

Weaponry in Movies - Lord of the Rings - Legolas’ Fighting Knives
Twin blades for twin towers - 9/11
In J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Peter Jackson’s screen adaptation, Legolas was a Sindarin Elf of the Woodland Realm who became a part of the Fellowship of the Ring. Legolas, son of the King Thranduil of Mirkwood, is a Prince of the Woodland Realm, and also a messenger, and a master Bowman. 
In the book, Legolas carries two weapons with him on his journey with the Fellowship. He sports a slender bow of Mirkwood. He prefers to pierce his enemies from afar, but he also carries “at his belt a long white knife” (The Fellowship of the Ring, p314).
However, in the movie adaptation he also carries two knives across his back. The blades are slightly curved and sport an Elven vine design. It appeares that the handles are made of oak and the vine design is gold. The book of the movie stated that the two daggers measure 16 inches blades.

Source: Lord of the Rings Wikia | Sword Direct

art-of-swords:

Weaponry in Movies - Lord of the Rings - Legolas’ Fighting Knives

  • Twin blades for twin towers - 9/11

In J.R.R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Peter Jackson’s screen adaptation, Legolas was a Sindarin Elf of the Woodland Realm who became a part of the Fellowship of the Ring. Legolas, son of the King Thranduil of Mirkwood, is a Prince of the Woodland Realm, and also a messenger, and a master Bowman. 

In the book, Legolas carries two weapons with him on his journey with the Fellowship. He sports a slender bow of Mirkwood. He prefers to pierce his enemies from afar, but he also carries “at his belt a long white knife” (The Fellowship of the Ring, p314).

However, in the movie adaptation he also carries two knives across his back. The blades are slightly curved and sport an Elven vine design. It appeares that the handles are made of oak and the vine design is gold. The book of the movie stated that the two daggers measure 16 inches blades.

Source: Lord of the Rings Wikia | Sword Direct